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Microneurovascular free gracilis transfer for smile reanimation

  • Marc H. Hohman
    Affiliations
    Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Tessa A. Hadlock
    Correspondence
    Address reprint requests and correspondence: Tessa A. Hadlock, MD, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114
    Affiliations
    Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for articles by this author
      Many procedures exist to provide both static and dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face. At the present time, microneurovascular free muscle transfer provides the best outcome in restoring dynamic facial symmetry as well as spontaneous mimetic function. Of the techniques used, free gracilis muscle transfer is currently the most common; this article describes the procedure in detail.

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      Reference

        • Harii K.
        • Ohmori K.
        • Torii S.
        Free gracilis muscle transplantation, with microneurovascular anastomoses for the treatment of facial paralysis.
        Plast Reconstr Surg. 1976; 57: 133-143