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The latissimus dorsi, pectoralis minor, and rectus abdominis free flaps for dynamic reconstruction of the paralyzed face

  • Matthew E. Spector
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Jennifer C. Kim
    Correspondence
    Address reprint requests and correspondence: Jennifer C. Kim, MD, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, 1904 Taubman Center, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
      The use of free tissue for dynamic reconstruction of the paralyzed face has allowed for the development of novel flaps aimed at maximizing the functional and cosmetic results. While the gracilis free-tissue transfer is highly popularized and well described, other donor sites are available for versatile pedicle length and soft-tissue adjuncts with minimal donor site morbidity. This article's aim is describe the surgical technique of other free-tissue options for dynamic reconstruction of the paralyzed face, specifically the latissimus dorsi, the pectoralis minor, and the rectus abdominis free-tissue transfer.

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