INTRODUCTION
• Submission checklist
BEFORE YOU BEGIN
• Ethics in publishing
• Studies in humans and animals
• Declaration of competing interest
• Submission declaration
• Use of inclusive language
• Author contributions
• Authorship
• Changes to authorship
• Copyright
• Role of the funding source
• Open access
• Informed consent and identifying details
• Submission
PREPARATION
• Peer Review
• Manuscript Format
• Article structure
• Essential title page information
• Highlights
• Abstract
• Keywords
• Artwork
• Tables
• References
• Data visualization
• Research Elements
• Appeal Procedure
• Permissions
AFTER ACCEPTANCE
• ESTIMATING MANUSCRIPT LENGTH
• Online proof correction
AUTHOR INQUIRIES






Editor-in-Chief: David Goldenberg, MD, FACS

Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery,

The Pennsylvania State University

The Milton S Hershey Medical Center

500 University Drive

PO Box 850 H091

Hershey, PA 17033

email: [email protected]



Managing Editor: David Newcombe

Stellar Medical Publications

20 North St

Plymouth, MA 02360

tel: 508-732-6767 x 11

email: [email protected]





For more than two decades, Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology has been the go to otolaryngology resource for all levels of learners. This peer-reviewed, procedure-driven, atlas-style journal publishes new and cutting edge techniques in otology, rhinology, laryngology, head and neck surgery, pediatric otolaryngology, and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Each issue features articles related to a central theme by anatomic area or disease process. The journal is at the forefront of publishing and highlighting new procedures and advanced surgical technology. Journal content addresses relevant anatomy, surgical options for treatment or rehabilitation, diagnosis, and imaging and complications. Articles are accompanied by high quality illustrations for optimal coverage.Please send your completed manuscript to the Guest Editor who has invited you to contribute.

AUTHORSHIP CRITERIA

Authors for Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery participate upon invitation by the Editors only. Invited authors may, upon approval of the editors, collaborate with co-authors on their work. As one of the conditions of authorship, all authors must have seen and approved the submission of the manuscript and be willing to take responsibility for the entire manuscript.

If you have general questions regarding the formating of your manuscript, please contact:
David Newcombe
Managing Editor
Stellar Medical Publications
20 North Street
Plymouth, MA 02360
Ph (508) 732-6767
[email protected]

DUPLICATE/PRIOR/OVERLAPPING PUBLICATION OR SUBMISSION

Review and analysis of previously published material is appropriate providing that the prior work is fully acknowledged and cited. Simple reproduction of previously published work is clearly not permitted. If any part of a manuscript replicates information that was previously published, is in press, or is under consideration by another publication, a reprint of the previous article or a copy of the other manuscript must be submitted to the Editor at the point of submission, with a justification or explanation by the authors of any potential overlap or duplication.

Submission checklist

You can use this list to carry out a final check of your submission before you send it to the journal for review. Please check the relevant section in this Guide for Authors for more details.

Ensure that the following items are present:

One author has been designated as the corresponding author with contact details:
• E-mail address
• Full postal address

All necessary files have been uploaded:
Manuscript:
• Include keywords
• All figures (include relevant captions)
• All tables (including titles, description, footnotes)
• Ensure all figure and table citations in the text match the files provided
• Indicate clearly if color should be used for any figures in print
Graphical Abstracts / Highlights files (where applicable)
Supplemental files (where applicable)

Further considerations
• Manuscript has been 'spell checked' and 'grammar checked'
• All references mentioned in the Reference List are cited in the text, and vice versa
• Permission has been obtained for use of copyrighted material from other sources (including the Internet)
• A competing interests statement is provided, even if the authors have no competing interests to declare
• Journal policies detailed in this guide have been reviewed
• Referee suggestions and contact details provided, based on journal requirements

For further information, visit our Support Center.




Ethics in publishing

Please see our information on Ethics in publishing.

Studies in humans and animals

If the work involves the use of human subjects, the author should ensure that the work described has been carried out in accordance with The Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) for experiments involving humans. The manuscript should be in line with the Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals and aim for the inclusion of representative human populations (sex, age and ethnicity) as per those recommendations. The terms sex and gender should be used correctly.

Authors should include a statement in the manuscript that informed consent was obtained for experimentation with human subjects. The privacy rights of human subjects must always be observed.

All animal experiments should comply with the ARRIVE guidelines and should be carried out in accordance with the U.K. Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986 and associated guidelines, EU Directive 2010/63/EU for animal experiments, or the National Research Council's Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and the authors should clearly indicate in the manuscript that such guidelines have been followed. The sex of animals must be indicated, and where appropriate, the influence (or association) of sex on the results of the study.

Disclosure

According to the World Association of Medical Editors:
"Conflict of interest (COI) exists when there is a divergence between an individual's private interests (competing interests) and his or her responsibilities to scientific and publishing activities such that a reasonable observer might wonder if the individual's behavior or judgment was motivated by considerations of his or her competing interests. COI in medical publishing affects everyone with a stake in research integrity including journals, research/academic institutions, funding agencies, the popular media, and the public. Journals are interested in COI as it relates to a specific manuscript. "Everyone has COIs of some sort. Having a competing interest does not, in itself, imply wrongdoing. However, it constitutes a problem when competing interests could unduly influence (or be reasonably seen to do so) one's responsibilities in the publication process. If COI is not managed effectively, it can cause authors, reviewers, and editors to make decisions that, consciously or unconsciously, tend to serve their competing interests at the expense of their responsibilities in the publication process, thereby distorting the scientific enterprise. This consequence of COI is especially dangerous when it is not immediately apparent to others. In addition, the appearance of COI, even where none actually exists, can also erode trust in a journal by damaging its reputation and credibility." Every article must contain a Disclosure section, which appears just before the references. In this section, every author must disclose any financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations that could potentially and inappropriately influence (bias) their work and conclusions. Examples of potential conflicts of interest include employment, consultancies, stock ownership, honoraria, paid expert testimony, patent applications/registrations, and research grants or other funding. The existence of competing interests is common and often inevitable. Competing interests are not inherently unethical, but not declaring them is. Any grant funding or support for the article should be listed in this section. If no conflicts exist, the authors should state: The authors report no proprietary or commercial interest in any product mentioned or concept discussed in this article.

Declaration of competing interest

Corresponding authors, on behalf of all the authors of a submission, must disclose any financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations that could inappropriately influence (bias) their work. Examples of potential conflicts of interest include employment, consultancies, stock ownership, honoraria, paid expert testimony, patent applications/registrations, and grants or other funding. All authors, including those without competing interests to declare, should provide the relevant information to the corresponding author (which, where relevant, may specify they have nothing to declare). Corresponding authors should then use this tool to create a shared statement and upload to the submission system at the Attach Files step. Please do not convert the .docx template to another file type. Author signatures are not required.

Submission declaration

Submission of an article implies that the work described has not been published previously (except in the form of an abstract, a published lecture or academic thesis, see 'Multiple, redundant or concurrent publication' for more information), that it is not under consideration for publication elsewhere, that its publication is approved by all authors and tacitly or explicitly by the responsible authorities where the work was carried out, and that, if accepted, it will not be published elsewhere in the same form, in English or in any other language, including electronically without the written consent of the copyright-holder.

Review and analysis of previously published material is appropriate providing that the prior work is fully acknowleged and cited. Simple reproduction of previously published work is clearly not permitted. If any part of a manuscript replicates information that was previously published, is in press, or is under consideration by another publication, a reprint of the previous article or a copy of the other manuscript must be submitted to the Editor at the point of submission, with a justification or explanation by the authors of any potential overlap or duplication.

Preprints

Please note that preprints can be shared anywhere at any time, in line with Elsevier's sharing policy. Sharing your preprints e.g. on a preprint server will not count as prior publication (see 'Multiple, redundant or concurrent publication' for more information).

Use of inclusive language

Inclusive language acknowledges diversity, conveys respect to all people, is sensitive to differences, and promotes equal opportunities. Content should make no assumptions about the beliefs or commitments of any reader; contain nothing which might imply that one individual is superior to another on the grounds of age, gender, race, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, disability or health condition; and use inclusive language throughout. Authors should ensure that writing is free from bias, stereotypes, slang, reference to dominant culture and/or cultural assumptions. We advise to seek gender neutrality by using plural nouns ("clinicians, patients/clients") as default/wherever possible to avoid using "he, she," or "he/she." We recommend avoiding the use of descriptors that refer to personal attributes such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, disability or health condition unless they are relevant and valid. When coding terminology is used, we recommend to avoid offensive or exclusionary terms such as "master", "slave", "blacklist" and "whitelist". We suggest using alternatives that are more appropriate and (self-) explanatory such as "primary", "secondary", "blocklist" and "allowlist". These guidelines are meant as a point of reference to help identify appropriate language but are by no means exhaustive or definitive.

Author contributions

For transparency, we encourage authors to submit an author statement file outlining their individual contributions to the paper using the relevant CRediT roles: Conceptualization; Data curation; Formal analysis; Funding acquisition; Investigation; Methodology; Project administration; Resources; Software; Supervision; Validation; Visualization; Roles/Writing - original draft; Writing - review & editing. Authorship statements should be formatted with the names of authors first and CRediT role(s) following. More details and an example.

Authorship

All authors should have made substantial contributions to all of the following: (1) the conception and design of the study, or acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data, (2) drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content, (3) final approval of the version to be submitted.

Changes to authorship

Authors are expected to consider carefully the list and order of authors before submitting their manuscript and provide the definitive list of authors at the time of the original submission. Any addition, deletion or rearrangement of author names in the authorship list should be made only before the manuscript has been accepted and only if approved by the journal Editor. To request such a change, the Editor must receive the following from the corresponding author: (a) the reason for the change in author list and (b) written confirmation (e-mail, letter) from all authors that they agree with the addition, removal or rearrangement. In the case of addition or removal of authors, this includes confirmation from the author being added or removed.
Only in exceptional circumstances will the Editor consider the addition, deletion or rearrangement of authors after the manuscript has been accepted. While the Editor considers the request, publication of the manuscript will be suspended. If the manuscript has already been published in an online issue, any requests approved by the Editor will result in a corrigendum.

Article transfer service

This journal uses the Elsevier Article Transfer Service to find the best home for your manuscript. This means that if an editor feels your manuscript is more suitable for an alternative journal, you might be asked to consider transferring the manuscript to such a journal. The recommendation might be provided by a Journal Editor, a dedicated Scientific Managing Editor, a tool assisted recommendation, or a combination. If you agree, your manuscript will be transferred, though you will have the opportunity to make changes to the manuscript before the submission is complete. Please note that your manuscript will be independently reviewed by the new journal. More information.

Copyright

Upon acceptance of an article, authors will be asked to complete a 'Journal Publishing Agreement' (see more information on this). An e-mail will be sent to the corresponding author confirming receipt of the manuscript together with a 'Journal Publishing Agreement' form or a link to the online version of this agreement.

Subscribers may reproduce tables of contents or prepare lists of articles including abstracts for internal circulation within their institutions. Permission of the Publisher is required for resale or distribution outside the institution and for all other derivative works, including compilations and translations. If excerpts from other copyrighted works are included, the author(s) must obtain written permission from the copyright owners and credit the source(s) in the article. Elsevier has preprinted forms for use by authors in these cases.

For gold open access articles: Upon acceptance of an article, authors will be asked to complete a 'License Agreement' (more information). Permitted third party reuse of gold open access articles is determined by the author's choice of user license.

Author rights
As an author you (or your employer or institution) have certain rights to reuse your work. More information.

Authors contributing a manuscript do so with the understanding that, once it is accepted for publication, copyright in the article, including the right to reproduce the article in all forms of media,shall be assigned exclusively to the Publisher.

Elsevier supports responsible sharing

Find out how you can share your research published in Elsevier journals.

Role of the funding source

You are requested to identify who provided financial support for the conduct of the research and/or preparation of the article and to briefly describe the role of the sponsor(s), if any, in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the article for publication. If the funding source(s) had no such involvement, it is recommended to state this.

Open access

Please visit our Open Access page for more information.

Elsevier Researcher Academy

Researcher Academy is a free e-learning platform designed to support early and mid-career researchers throughout their research journey. The "Learn" environment at Researcher Academy offers several interactive modules, webinars, downloadable guides and resources to guide you through the process of writing for research and going through peer review. Feel free to use these free resources to improve your submission and navigate the publication process with ease.

Language (usage and editing services)

Please write your text in good English (American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these). Authors who feel their English language manuscript may require editing to eliminate possible grammatical or spelling errors and to conform to correct scientific English may wish to use the English Language Editing service available from Elsevier's Author Services.

Informed consent and identifying details

Patients have a right to privacy. Therefore identifying information, including patients' images, names, initials, or hospital numbers, should not be included in videos, recordings, written descriptions, photographs, and pedigrees unless the information is essential for scientific purposes and you have obtained written informed consent for publication in print and electronic form from the patient (or parent, guardian, or next of kin where applicable). If such consent is made subject to any conditions, Elsevier must be made aware of all such conditions. Written consents must be provided to Elsevier on request. Even where consent has been given, identifying details should be omitted if they are not essential. If identifying characteristics are altered to protect anonymity, such as in genetic pedigrees, authors should provide assurance that alterations do not distort scientific meaning and editors should so note. If such consent has not been obtained, personal details of patients included in any part of the paper and in any supplementary materials (including all illustrations and videos) must be removed before submission.

Submission

Please send your completed manuscript to the Guest Editor who has invited you to contribute.




Peer Review

Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology prides itself in a thorough review process for both solicited and unsolicited content. Manuscripts are reviewed by Guest Editor, the Editor in Chief, and at least two selected external reviewers. All manuscripts receive single anonymized review. The international team of Editorial Board Members includes geographic reach from the United States, China, Israel, Germany, Taiwan, and elsewhere. The rigorous review program, paired with a team of international experts, ensures that only top quality articles are published.

Manuscript Format

All parts of the manuscript, including abstract, text, disclosure, references, tables, legends, quoted material, and case studies, must be typed double spaced — that is, with a full line of space after every typed line. Leave generous margins—at least one inch—on both sides and at the top and bottom of every page. The final version of the manuscript should be submitted by email.

Note: Every manuscript must contain a title page with an abstract, text, disclosure statement, and reference section.

Title Page
On the TITLE PAGE, please include all of the following information:
1. The names, degrees, and professional affiliation (position, department, institution, place) of all authors
2. The name of the institution where the work reported was done ("From...")
3. Acknowledge of grant support when appropriate ("Supported in part by...")
4. A complete mailing address (including U.S. Zip Code or Postal Code for other countries), phone, fax, and email for first proofs and for reprint requests.

Article structure

Subdivision - unnumbered sections

Divide your article into clearly defined sections. Each subsection is given a brief heading. Each heading should appear on its own separate line. Subsections should be used as much as possible when cross-referencing text: refer to the subsection by heading as opposed to simply 'the text'.

Appendices

If there is more than one appendix, they should be identified as A, B, etc. Formulae and equations in appendices should be given separate numbering: Eq. (A.1), Eq. (A.2), etc.; in a subsequent appendix, Eq. (B.1) and so on. Similarly for tables and figures: Table A.1; Fig. A.1, etc.

Essential title page information

Title. Concise and informative. Titles are often used in information-retrieval systems. Avoid abbreviations and formulae where possible.
Author names and affiliations. Please clearly indicate the given name(s) and family name(s) of each author and check that all names are accurately spelled. You can add your name between parentheses in your own script behind the English transliteration. Present the authors' affiliation addresses (where the actual work was done) below the names. Indicate all affiliations with a lower-case superscript letter immediately after the author's name and in front of the appropriate address. Provide the full postal address of each affiliation, including the country name and, if available, the e-mail address of each author.
Corresponding author. Clearly indicate who will handle correspondence at all stages of refereeing and publication, also post-publication. This responsibility includes answering any future queries about Methodology and Materials. Ensure that the e-mail address is given and that contact details are kept up to date by the corresponding author.
Present/permanent address. If an author has moved since the work described in the article was done, or was visiting at the time, a 'Present address' (or 'Permanent address') may be indicated as a footnote to that author's name. The address at which the author actually did the work must be retained as the main, affiliation address. Superscript Arabic numerals are used for such footnotes.

Highlights

Highlights are optional yet highly encouraged for this journal, as they increase the discoverability of your article via search engines. They consist of a short collection of bullet points that capture the novel results of your research as well as new methods that were used during the study (if any). Please have a look at the examples here: example Highlights.

Highlights should be submitted in a separate editable file in the online submission system. Please use 'Highlights' in the file name and include 3 to 5 bullet points (maximum 85 characters, including spaces, per bullet point).

Abstract

An ABSTRACT, of approximately 100 to 150 words, must be included. It should concisely state the objective, finding, and conclusion of the study/review and should not contain abbreviations, footnotes, or references.

Keywords

Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 6 keywords, using American spelling and avoiding general and plural terms and multiple concepts (avoid, for example, 'and', 'of'). Be sparing with abbreviations: only abbreviations firmly established in the field may be eligible. These keywords will be used for indexing purposes.

Acknowledgements

Collate acknowledgements in a separate section at the end of the article before the references and do not, therefore, include them on the title page, as a footnote to the title or otherwise. List here those individuals who provided help during the research (e.g., providing language help, writing assistance or proof reading the article, etc.).

Formatting of funding sources

List funding sources in this standard way to facilitate compliance to funder's requirements:

Funding: This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [grant numbers xxxx, yyyy]; the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle, WA [grant number zzzz]; and the United States Institutes of Peace [grant number aaaa].

It is not necessary to include detailed descriptions on the program or type of grants and awards. When funding is from a block grant or other resources available to a university, college, or other research institution, submit the name of the institute or organization that provided the funding.

If no funding has been provided for the research, it is recommended to include the following sentence:

This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Units

Follow internationally accepted rules and conventions: use the international system of units (SI). If other units are mentioned, please give their equivalent in SI.

Math formulae

Please submit math equations as editable text and not as images. Present simple formulae in line with normal text where possible and use the solidus (/) instead of a horizontal line for small fractional terms, e.g., X/Y. In principle, variables are to be presented in italics. Powers of e are often more conveniently denoted by exp. Number consecutively any equations that have to be displayed separately from the text (if referred to explicitly in the text).

Footnotes

Footnotes should be used sparingly. Number them consecutively throughout the article. Many word processors can build footnotes into the text, and this feature may be used. Otherwise, please indicate the position of footnotes in the text and list the footnotes themselves separately at the end of the article. Do not include footnotes in the Reference list.

Artwork

Electronic artwork

General points
• Make sure you use uniform lettering and sizing of your original artwork.
• Embed the used fonts if the application provides that option.
• Aim to use the following fonts in your illustrations: Arial, Courier, Times New Roman, Symbol, or use fonts that look similar.
• Number the illustrations according to their sequence in the text.
• Use a logical naming convention for your artwork files.
• Provide captions to illustrations separately.
• Size the illustrations close to the desired dimensions of the published version.
• Submit each illustration as a separate file.
• Ensure that color images are accessible to all, including those with impaired color vision.

A detailed guide on electronic artwork is available.
You are urged to visit this site; some excerpts from the detailed information are given here.
Formats
If your electronic artwork is created in a Microsoft Office application (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) then please supply 'as is' in the native document format.
Regardless of the application used other than Microsoft Office, when your electronic artwork is finalized, please 'Save as' or convert the images to one of the following formats (note the resolution requirements for line drawings, halftones, and line/halftone combinations given below):
EPS (or PDF): Vector drawings, embed all used fonts.
TIFF (or JPEG): Color or grayscale photographs (halftones), keep to a minimum of 300 dpi.
TIFF (or JPEG): Bitmapped (pure black & white pixels) line drawings, keep to a minimum of 1000 dpi.
TIFF (or JPEG): Combinations bitmapped line/half-tone (color or grayscale), keep to a minimum of 500 dpi.
Please do not:
• Supply files that are optimized for screen use (e.g., GIF, BMP, PICT, WPG); these typically have a low number of pixels and limited set of colors;
• Supply files that are too low in resolution;
• Submit graphics that are disproportionately large for the content.

Color artwork

Please make sure that artwork files are in an acceptable format (TIFF (or JPEG), EPS (or PDF), or MS Office files) and with the correct resolution. If, together with your accepted article, you submit usable color figures then Elsevier will ensure, at no additional charge, that these figures will appear in color online (e.g., ScienceDirect and other sites) regardless of whether or not these illustrations are reproduced in color in the printed version. For color reproduction in print, you will receive information regarding the costs from Elsevier after receipt of your accepted article. Please indicate your preference for color: in print or online only. Further information on the preparation of electronic artwork.

Illustrations

All tables and figures must be cited in the text.

ILLUSTRATIONS should be identified by figure number.

Illustrations are preferred electronically. They MUST be sent as high-resolution files. We cannot accept files embedded in MS Word (the resolution is extremely poor), and we cannot accept files sent as Powerpoint presentations. Figures should be at least 300+ pixels/inch, at least 3"x4", and in either TIFF format or JPEG/JPG format.

ILLUSTRATION LEGENDS are also to be numbered in Arabic numerals (Fig 1, Fig 2). Legends should be sufficiently detailed to allow understanding without reference to the text.

Tables

TABLES are to be numbered with Arabic numerals (Table 1, Table 2) in order of their text citation. Each table should be typed (double- spaced throughout) on a separate page and should have a title. Maximum table width: 144 characters (ie, letters and spaces). Use spaces, not vertical rules, to separate columns. Each table should have a legend in sufficient detail to allow understanding without reference to the text.

References

Citation in text

Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa). Any references cited in the abstract must be given in full. Unpublished results and personal communications are not recommended in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text. If these references are included in the reference list they should follow the standard reference style of the journal and should include a substitution of the publication date with either 'Unpublished results' or 'Personal communication'. Citation of a reference as 'in press' implies that the item has been accepted for publication.

Reference links

Increased discoverability of research and high quality peer review are ensured by online links to the sources cited. In order to allow us to create links to abstracting and indexing services, such as Scopus, Crossref and PubMed, please ensure that data provided in the references are correct. Please note that incorrect surnames, journal/book titles, publication year and pagination may prevent link creation. When copying references, please be careful as they may already contain errors. Use of the DOI is highly encouraged.

A DOI is guaranteed never to change, so you can use it as a permanent link to any electronic article. An example of a citation using DOI for an article not yet in an issue is: VanDecar J.C., Russo R.M., James D.E., Ambeh W.B., Franke M. (2003). Aseismic continuation of the Lesser Antilles slab beneath northeastern Venezuela. Journal of Geophysical Research, https://doi.org/10.1029/2001JB000884. Please note the format of such citations should be in the same style as all other references in the paper.

Data references

This journal encourages you to cite underlying or relevant datasets in your manuscript by citing them in your text and including a data reference in your Reference List. Data references should include the following elements: author name(s), dataset title, data repository, version (where available), year, and global persistent identifier. Add [dataset] immediately before the reference so we can properly identify it as a data reference. The [dataset] identifier will not appear in your published article.

Preprint references

Where a preprint has subsequently become available as a peer-reviewed publication, the formal publication should be used as the reference. If there are preprints that are central to your work or that cover crucial developments in the topic, but are not yet formally published, these may be referenced. Preprints should be clearly marked as such, for example by including the word preprint, or the name of the preprint server, as part of the reference. The preprint DOI should also be provided.

References in a special issue

Please ensure that the words 'this issue' are added to any references in the list (and any citations in the text) to other articles in the same Special Issue.

Reference style

REFERENCE NUMBERS in the text follow numerical order and are denoted in text by superscript numbers. References are listed in the order in which they are referred to in the text, not in alphabetical order. Do not assign a new number to the same reference used a second time, and do not assign more than one reference to any number. The names of the first six authors are used, followed by “et al.” Do not use “and” between names. Information from manuscripts not yet accepted or from personal communications should be cited in parentheses in the text. For all journal abbreviations, follow the style of Index Medicus. Examples follow.

Journal
1. Parkin DM, Clayton D, Black RJ, Masuyer E, Friedl HP, Ivanov E, et al. Childhood leukaemia in Europe after Chernobyl: 5 year follow-up. Br J Cancer 1996;73:1006-12.

Book
2. Ringsven MK, Bond D. Gerontology and leadership skills for nurses. 2nd ed. Albany (NY): Delmar Publishers; 1996.

Book Chapter
3. Phillips SJ, Whisnant JP. Hypertension and stroke. In: Laragh JH, Brenner BM, editors. Hypertension: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. 2nd ed. New York: Raven Press; 1995. p. 465-78

If referencing a Web site, be sure to include the complete URL along with the date the page was accessed.
7. http://www.stellarmedicalpublications.com/format.pdf (accessed 3/17/2011)

Journal abbreviations source

Journal names should be abbreviated according to the List of Title Word Abbreviations.

Data visualization

Include interactive data visualizations in your publication and let your readers interact and engage more closely with your research. Follow the instructions here to find out about available data visualization options and how to include them with your article.

Research Elements

This journal enables you to publish research objects related to your original research – such as data, methods, protocols, software and hardware – as an additional paper in Research Elements.

Research Elements is a suite of peer-reviewed, open access journals which make your research objects findable, accessible and reusable. Articles place research objects into context by providing detailed descriptions of objects and their application, and linking to the associated original research articles. Research Elements articles can be prepared by you, or by one of your collaborators.

During submission, you will be alerted to the opportunity to prepare and submit a Research Elements article.

More information can be found on the Research Elements page.

All parts of the manuscript, including abstract, text, disclosure, references, tables, legends, quoted material, and case studies, must be typed double spaced — that is, with a full line of space after every typed line.

Leave generous margins—at least one inch—on both sides and at the top and bottom of every page. The final version of the manuscript should be submitted by email.

Note: Every manuscript must contain a title page with an abstract, text, disclosure statement, and reference section.

Title Page
On the TITLE PAGE, please include all of the following information:
  • 1. The names, degrees, and professional affiliation (position, department, institution, place) of all authors
  • 2. The name of the institution where the work reported was done ("From...")
  • 3. Acknowledge of grant support when appropriate ("Supported in part by...")
  • 4. A complete mailing address (including U.S. Zip Code or Postal Code for other countries), phone, fax, and email for first proofs and for reprint requests.


Appeal Procedure

Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology accepts unsolicited submissions, in addition to inviting issue-based content and review articles. The Journal accepts a relatively small percentage of submissions received. If your paper is rejected but the reviews are accurate, please do not appeal the decision and request additional reviews. Doing so distracts the journal's editors and reviewers from evaluating submissions and editorial staff from processing other manuscripts and is unfair to the authors of those papers. If, however, the reviewer or editor assessments are reconsidered, the Editor-in-Chief will entertain an appeal and reopen the manuscript's file.
Any appeal must be made by the corresponding author to the Editorial Office by email prior to resubmitting the manuscript. Please do not resubmit a revised version of a rejected manuscript without an appeal to the Editorial office. Please do not resubmit until your original manuscript is released back to you. By waiting for the manuscript release, it ensures that your paper is processed under the same manuscript number, keeping the manuscript history intact.

Permissions

If any illustration has been previously published, a copy of the letter of PERMISSION from the copyright holder must accompany the illustration. The source of the illustration should be included among the References to the paper. The figure legend should conclude with "Reprinted with permission" followed by the reference number. For example: “Reprinted with permission.(23)” The cost of any permission fees must be paid by the author.




ESTIMATING MANUSCRIPT LENGTH

We are counting on your cooperation in remaining within our page limitations. The following approximations are offered to help you calculate the length of your manuscript:
3 8½ X 11 inch pages, double-spaced, with
1½ inch margins, in standard 10- or
12-point word processor type
(approx. 250 words per page) = 1 printed page
4 tables or figures with legends = 1 printed page
35 references (all lines double-spaced) = 1 printed page

Example: A manuscript contains 15 pages of text with 17 references, and 6 tables.
15 pages of text = 5 printed pages
6 figures or tables = 1½ printed pages
17 references = ½ printed page
7 printed pages

Online proof correction

To ensure a fast publication process of the article, we kindly ask authors to provide us with their proof corrections within two days. Corresponding authors will receive an e-mail with a link to our online proofing system, allowing annotation and correction of proofs online. The environment is similar to MS Word: in addition to editing text, you can also comment on figures/tables and answer questions from the Copy Editor. Web-based proofing provides a faster and less error-prone process by allowing you to directly type your corrections, eliminating the potential introduction of errors.
If preferred, you can still choose to annotate and upload your edits on the PDF version. All instructions for proofing will be given in the e-mail we send to authors, including alternative methods to the online version and PDF.
We will do everything possible to get your article published quickly and accurately. Please use this proof only for checking the typesetting, editing, completeness and correctness of the text, tables and figures. Significant changes to the article as accepted for publication will only be considered at this stage with permission from the Editor. It is important to ensure that all corrections are sent back to us in one communication. Please check carefully before replying, as inclusion of any subsequent corrections cannot be guaranteed. Proofreading is solely your responsibility.




Visit the Elsevier Support Center to find the answers you need. Here you will find everything from Frequently Asked Questions to ways to get in touch.
You can also check the status of your submitted article or find out when your accepted article will be published.